Sermons on Christ's Work

Sermons on Christ's Work

Hebrews 10:11-18

In Hebrews 10:11-18 the author brings the longest theological section of the book to a close. Summing up his previous arguments he notes that the priests stand each day offering the same sacrifices that cannot take away sins, whereas Christ has once and for all been seated at the right hand of the Father, having definitively completed His work. All of this forms the basis for the exhortations to follow: Since we have a great high priest, let us hold…

Hebrews 10:1-10

In Hebrews 10:1-10 the author contrasts the efficacy of the blood of bulls and goats to that of Christ. The blood of bulls and goats could not take away sins, but Christ, as the Son of God who became man, is able to cleanse all those who come to Him from their sins. Pastor Grasso highlights in this way the significance of the incarnation for atonement.

Hebrews 9:23-28

In Hebrews 9:23-28 the author explains the cleansing power of Christ’s blood. Pastor Grasso explains the distinction between propitiation and expiation to understand these two elements of the atonement. Propitiation is the satisfaction of God’s wrath. Expiation is cleansing from sin. Christ’s blood, however, has a cosmic element to its cleansing. As Adam’s fall resulted in the world being subject to corruption, so too, in Christ’s death, the world is cleansed so as to bring forth a new creation.

Hebrews 9:15-22

In Hebrews 9:15-22 the author explains the significance of Christ being the mediator of the new covenant. As the mediator of the covenant He had to die to instituted the testamentary aspect of the covenant. Is the new covenant a testament? Yes, because it grants the right to an inheritance. The glory of the mediator is seen in that by His blood this inheritance is now in place for His people and by that same blood He has cleansed us…

Matthew 12:38-42

In Matthew 12:38-42 the Pharisees and scribes continue to challenge Christ. This time they challenge Him by requesting a sign from Him. This request comes after Christ has already given innumerable signs to prove who He is. Rather than perform a sign on demand, which He refuses to do, Christ says the only sign that will be given is the sign of Jonah, His resurrection from the dead.

Matthew 12:22-29

In Matthew 12:22-29 the Pharisees accuse Christ of casting out demons by the prince of demons. They see what is obviously a good work which could only be done by the power of God (cf. John 3:2) and yet choose to say that this was done by Satan. Christ, however, shows that what he has done was done by the power of the Holy Spirit, and therefore the Kingdom of God has come. The Kingdom has come today, but many…

Matthew 12:15-21

In Matthew 12:15-21 Matthew shows that Jesus healing many shows that he is the one who fulfills Isaiah 42:1-4, the first Servant Song speaking about the coming Messiah. Christ is the chosen one of God, loved by him, filled with the Spirit, who brings salvation to the Gentiles. He is the humble savior, mighty enough to defeat all enemies and gentle enough to care for those who are weak.

John 20:19-23

In John 20:19-23 Christ breathes the Spirit on His disciples. John describes this action in ways similar to Genesis 2:7 where God breathed the breath of life into Adam’s nostrils. Christ, the author of the new creation, who became a life-giving Spirit through His resurrection, sovereignly brings dead sinners to life through the giving of the Spirit. Thus, anyone in Christ is a new creation.

Hebrews 4:9-10

In Hebrews 4:9-10, the author speaks about a “sabbath rest” that remains for the people of God (v. 9).  He then shoes how Christ has rested from his works as God did from his (v. 10), providing the basis for this rest.  Pastor Grasso defends this reading of verse 10 and shows the ways in which Christ’s work of redemption is related to creation and, more particularly, the new creation.

Hebrews 3:1-6

In Hebrews 3:1-6, the author compares Christ to Moses. Moses was the greatest OT prophet and was “faithful in all God’s house” (Num 12:7). Having shown that Christ truly became a man, lowering himself below the angels, the author now shows that he is greater than the greatest of men, Moses. Whereas Moses is faithful in God’s house as the servant of God. Christ is faithful over God’s house as the Son of God. Moses was in the house. Christ…

Hebrews 2:10-18

In Hebrews 2:10-18, the author continues to discuss the incarnation. Why did Christ become man? Ultimately to die. Far from this proving that he is not a ruler, his death is actually his “crowning with glory and honor” because by his death he has defeated the devil and made atonement for sin. Christ, the Son of God, became man for this reason.

Matthew 10:34-42

In Matthew 10:34-42 Christ says that he has not come to bring peace but a sword. How can this be? Though there are many ways in which Christ does come to bring peace, one of the effects of his coming is that people come divided against each other. This is because Christ demands absolute devotion and obedience. There is to be nothing in life that challenges this, even one’s family. This is the cost of following Christ. In the end,…