Sermons on Hebrews

Sermons on Hebrews

Hebrews 7:1-28

Christ’s work as priest is not limited to his sacrifice on the cross. He continues to serve as priest having been raised from the dead. He is the priest forever after the order of Melchizedek and pleads the merits of his blood on behalf of his people.

Hebrews 8:1-9:14

Jesus is our great High Priest, through whom the way has been opened to God. How was this way opened? Through his death. Christ is both the priest and the sacrifice whereby we are cleansed from our sins and enabled to approach God without fear.

Hebrews 1-13

The genre of the book of Hebrews is self described as a “word of exhortation”, which was a phrase used in the ancient church to describe a sermon.  Therefore, it is good to consider the letter as a whole. Pastor Grasso reads the letter as a sermon.

Hebrews 13:20-25

The author ends his letter with a glorious benediction. Pastor Grasso explains the purpose of benedictions in general and the significance of the one in the letter to the Hebrews.

Hebrews 13:7-16

In Hebrews 13:7-16 the author explains that christians ought to obey their leaders rather than be led away after the false teachings of others who emphasize an earthly altar.  The passage is a reminder that our faith focuses on the world to come rather than this one.

Hebrews 13:7-9, 17-19

In Hebrews 13:7-19 the author focuses on the need of the church to submit to leaders.  They are to consider the outcome of their lives and imitate their faith.  This passage shows the high calling leaders in the church have as well as the obligation of church members to submit.

Hebrews 13:1-6

In the exhortations in the book of Hebrews the author has highlighted the need to strive together for faith. In Hebrews 13:1-6 he gives practical instruction concerning how christians ought to love one another so as to edify one another and strengthen the body for perseverance. 

Hebrews 12:25-29

In Hebrews 12:25-29 the author gives a final exhortation not to turn away from the Lord. Since there are greater privileges in the New Covenant associated with approach to Mt. Zion, the christian ought not to refuse him who speaks from heaven.  This all the more since he has received as unshakeable kingdom.

Hebrews 12:18-24

In Hebrews 12:18-24 the author uses the figures of Mt. Sinai and Mt. Zion to highlight the differences between the Old Covenant and the New.  The New Covenant is both more glorious and provides more sure access to God.  Those who approached God in the Old Covenant did so with fear and trembling.  Now through the blood of Christ we can approach with confidence.

Hebrews 12:14-17

In Hebrews 12:14-17 the author exhorts the church to pursue peace and holiness.  Pursuing these things ought to be done in the context of the church as a whole, with every member seeking to encourage others.

Hebrews 12:4-13

In Hebrews 12:4-13 the author shows the positive element of suffering. Because God loves you and sent his Son to die for you, the things you suffer come to you as fatherly discipline. This is a benefit of adoption that all of God’s children enjoy. If you are outside of Christ, you do not have this benefit. The author to the Hebrews says that the one who does not experience discipline from God is an illegitimate child. Why do the…

Hebrews 12:1-3

How can you run the race of faith well? The author to the Hebrews says Look to Jesus. The doctrine of Christ is the centerpiece of the letter to the Hebrews and the implications for life are clear: those who know Christ endure. He is the author and perfecter of faith, the one who died, and yet was raised from the dead and seated at the right hand of God.