Sermons on Deuteronomy

Sermons on Deuteronomy

Deuteronomy 22:9-30

In Deuteronomy 22:9-30 Moses begins to expound the 7th commandment.  Here he shows what entails adultery.  The passage teaches that one is to be pure and unmixed with the practices of the world and with unbelievers in marriage (22:9-12), that sex before marriage is wrong (22:13-21), that sex with a married woman is a great sin against God (22:22), that guilt for sexual sins must take circumstances into account (22:23-27), that violations of women obligate the violating man to provide…

Deuteronomy 21:10-22:8

The sixth commandment, “You shall not murder”, entails more than simply refraining from killing another person.  In Deuteronomy 21:10-22:8 Moses expounds the sixth commandment to include preserving life for the vulnerable, those in one’s family, and even one’s enemies.  It is a violation of the sixth commandment to deprive another of the things needed for life.

Deuteronomy 20:1-20

In Deuteronomy 20:1-20 Moses gives instructions for war.  Contrary to pacifist teaching, the Bible is not absolutely against war in this world.  There are regulations, however.  A just war is one that is fought for just ends.  In such situations those fighting must trust in God and not be afraid.  A just war is conducted so as to preserve the lives of women and children.  We are reminded in all of these laws that God is the one who fights…

Deuteronomy 19:1-21; 21:1-9

In Deuteronomy 19:1-21 and 21:1-9 Moses deals with how Israel is apply the sixth commandment prohibiting murder in public life.  Moses commanded the Israelites to set aside cities of refuge so that people who unintentionally kill another may flee there and be saved.  In these passages Moses emphasizes the importance of intention for guilt in murder, the establishment of the truth with multiple witnesses, the importance of the death penalty, and the imperfection of justice in this life (which leads…

Deuteronomy 18:9-22, Part 2

In Deuteronomy 18:9-22 Moses speaks of a “prophet like Moses”, like himself, whom God will raise up.  This prophet, who is the Lord Jesus Christ (see part 1), is the one who perfectly reveals God, identifies with his people, works great wonders among them, and saves them from their sins.  In all of these things, Christ is not only like Moses but actually far surpasses him.

Deuteronomy 18:9-22, Part 1

In Deuteronomy 18:9-22 God promises to raise up a “prophet like Moses” for the people of God, but Deuteronomy 34:10-12 indicates that this had not happened (written sometime after Moses’ death).  Ultimately, though all prophets resemble Moses in some way, none are like him.  Who is the prophet like Moses?  Who fulfills the prophecy of Deuteronomy 18:9-22?  The Lord Jesus Christ.

Deuteronomy 18:1-8

In Deuteronomy 18:1-8 Moses gives instructions concerning contributions for the Levites. Because they maintain the worship of God, they are to receive support from sacrifices brought to the sanctuary. The same principle applies to those who preach the gospel (1 Cor. 9:13-14). Ultimately, failing to support those who labor in the worship of God is a sign of spiritual weakness.

Deuteronomy 17:14-20

In Deuteronomy 17:14-20 Moses details the laws for the king.  In contrast to the nations around Israel, these laws severely limit the power of the king because the king himself must recognize God’s superior power, that is, the king himself is under the law of God. This has implications for government today. As Samuel Rutherford argued “The Law is King”.  The biblical form of government is limited.

Deuteronomy 16:18-17:13

Justice is something easily misunderstood.  All seek to do what is right and just, but what does the Bible say about justice?  In Deuteronomy 16:18-17:13 Moses addresses this issue as he begins to expound the 5th commandment.  Justice is ultimately found in the just judge of all the Earth, God Himself, who will judge the world in righteousness.  Biblical justice is a reflection of Him.   In describing this justice, Moses points to it being free from bribery or partiality. …

Deuteronomy 16:1-17

In Deuteronomy 16:1-17 Moses gives instructions about the three annual feasts in Israel’s calendar: the Feast of Unleavened Bread (associated with the Passover), the Feast of Weeks (Pentecost), and the Feast of Tabernacles/Booths.  All three of these feasts show that worship is communion with God, that it is based on past redemption, and that it rejoices in the blessings of salvation while looking forward to the consummation of all things in the New Heavens and New Earth.  All of this…

Deuteronomy 15:19-23

In Deuteronomy 15:19-23 Moses gives the law concerning offering the firstborn of an Israelite’s clean animals to God, emphasizing that the animals used in sacrifice must also be without blemish.  This law builds on the theology of the Passover and Exodus where God redeemed His people so as to spare the firstborn of Israel through the blood of a lamb.  This law was meant to be a reminder of what it takes to make an atonement whereby the people of…

Deuteronomy 15:1-18

Moses continues to expound the 4th commandment in Deuteronomy 15:1-18 by explaining the year of debt cancellation that was to happen every seven years.  The seventh year points to an organic connection with Sabbath law, showing the significance of the Sabbath: it is a celebration of having our debt before God cancelled and being released from slavery.  All of this is fulfilled in Christ through his great redemption.